Volvo will make only electric cars from 2030

Photo: AP

The Sweden based car maker Volvo announced it would switch to making only electric vehicles from 2030 and halt production of all cars with internal combustion engines - including hybrids, AP reported. The call comes in line with the companies strategy for reducing greenhouse gases.

“There is no long-term future for cars with an internal combustion engine,” said Henrik Green, Volvo’s chief technology officer. Volvo’s announcement follows General Motors’ pledge earlier this year to make only battery-powered vehicles by 2035. Volvo also said that, while its all-electric vehicles will be sold exclusively online, dealerships will “remain a crucial part of the customer experience and will continue to be responsible for a variety of important services such as selling, preparing, delivering and servicing cars.” As part of the announcement the Swedish automaker will introduce its second fully electric car, a follow-up to last year’s XC40 Recharge, a compact SUV. Volvo said its goal is to have half of its global sales to be fully electric cars by 2025, with the remaining half made up of hybrids.

“We are firmly committed to becoming an electric-only car maker,” Green said. “It will allow us to meet the expectations of our customers and be a part of the solution when it comes to fighting climate change.” About 2.5 million electric vehicles were sold worldwide last year and industry analyst IHS Markit forecasts that to increase by 70% in 2021. Volvo says it sold 661,713 cars in about 100 countries cars worldwide in 2020.

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