US, European airlines cancel flights to Israel

Photo: EPA

British Airways, Virgin Atlantic and Iberia became the latest of a number of airlines to cancel flights to and from Israel amid rising tension of the escalating conflict in the region, Reuters reported. All companies stated that safety of crew and passengers is essential and will not be put on risk. "The safety and security of our colleagues and customers is always our top priority, and we continue to monitor the situation closely," British Airways said after cancelling its flights to and from Tel Aviv.

Virgin Atlantic also cancelled scheduled flights and noted it would monitor the situation for a potential restart of regular flights. Spanish airline Iberia also cancelled its flight to Tel Aviv from Madrid on Thursday and back on Friday a spokeswoman said, while Germany's Lufthansa also cancelled its flights. "Due to the current situation in Israel, Lufthansa is suspending its flights to Tel Aviv until Friday," the airline said. Wizz Air said it had delayed its Thursday flight from Abu Dhabi to Tel Aviv until Friday.

Emirati carrier Flydubai said it was continuing to operate daily flights from Dubai to Tel Aviv. The airline was scheduled to operate three flights on Thursday, its website showed, while a fourth night time flight was cancelled. United Airlines, Delta Air Lines and American Airlines all cancelled flights between the United States and Tel Aviv. Virgin Atlantic had said earlier this week that bookings to Israel had soared 250% week on week after an announcement by Britain that Israel was on its "green list" for the reopening of overseas leisure travel during the Covid-19 pandemic. But an explosion of violence, with fighting in Jerusalem and the Gaza Strip causing mounting civilian deaths, have made international airlines wary of the region.

 

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