UK, 6 EU countries stop fossil fuel exports funding

Photo: EPA Bruno Le Maire

UK and six EU countries vowed to stop providing guarantees, related to all projects linked to exports of fossil fuels, Reuters reported. The initiative includes Britain, Germany, France, The Netherlands, Denmark and Sweden. Official representatives of governments in London, Paris and Berlin are expected to seal formally the pact on Wednesday, French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said. The intended deal includes halt of all public export guarantees.

Coal, oil and gas infrastructure have traditionally made up a large share of the portfolios of many countries’ public export finance agencies, which support exports through state-backed financing guarantees and insurance against losses abroad. Britain, France and Sweden have already laid out plans to halt export guarantees for the fossil fuel sector while the other countries in the group have yet to decide how fast they will phase out their support. “We are totally determined to stop all export guarantees financing fossil fuels while taking into account each country’s industrial specifics and the impact on jobs,” Le Maire said.

Speaking before a meeting on Wednesday where the pledge is to be formalised, Le Maire added that he hoped US President Joe Biden’s administration would join the group, which together accounts for 40% of export finance among OECD countries, following an upcoming review of US export finance. Le Maire also said the seven countries would commit to supporting climate-friendly projects and transparency in their export finance policies.

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