Turkey is playing 'a dangerous game' in Libya, Macron says

Emmanuel Macron (R) welcomes Tunisian President Kais Saied at the Elysee Palace, Paris, 22 June.

France will not tolerate Turkey's military intervention in Libya, President Emmanuel Macron said on Monday, accusing Ankara of playing "a dangerous game", news wires reported. Turkey has intervened decisively in recent weeks in Libya, providing air support, weapons and allied fighters from Syria to help the government based in Tripoli repel a year-long assault by eastern military leader Khalifa Haftar.

"I have already had the opportunity to say very clearly to President (Tayyip) Erdogan, I consider that Turkey is playing a dangerous game in Libya today and going against all of its commitments made at the Berlin conference," Macron said alongside his Tunisian counterpart Kais Saied, referring to a peace meeting earlier this year. "We won't tolerate the role that Turkey is playing in Libya," he stressed.

Turkey's help appears to have secured Libya's capital and the west of the country for the Tripoli government against Haftar's Libyan National Army (LNA), which is backed by the United Arab Emirates, Egypt and Russia.

Paris has been accused of supporting Haftar politically, having previously given him military assistance to fight Islamist militants. France denies backing Haftar but has stopped short of rebuking his allies, while repeatedly criticising Turkey.

Macron, who spoke earlier on Monday by phone to US President Donald Trump on the crisis in Libya, briefly condemned the role of Russian mercenaries in Libya, but focused mostly on Ankara's role.

When asked about Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi suggesting he had a right to intervene in Libya, Macron said the Egyptian leader had reason to be worried.

"This is a Mediterranean subject that affects us because today from Libya each day men and women are fleeing misery to come to Europe. Do you think we can let Turkey for a long time import Syrian fighters to Libya given everything we know?", Macron asked.

 

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