Toyota rockets to become world's No.1 car seller

Photo: EPA

The Japan carmaker Toyota cruised past Germany’s Volkswagen to become world’s No.1 in vehicle sales last year, Reuters reported. The swap in positions was triggered by pandemic as the slump in sales due to lockdowns and travel restrictions was felt harder by the German company.

Toyota announced its group-wide global sales fell 11.3% to 9,528 million vehicles in 2020.  hat is compared with a 15.2 percent drop at Volkswagen to 9,305 million vehicles. Automakers have suffered as coronavirus lockdowns have stopped people from visiting car showrooms and forced manufacturing plants to reduce or halt production.

Toyota, however, has offset the pandemic better because its home market Japan, and the Asian region in general, have been less affected by the outbreak than Europe and the United States.

“Our focus is not on what our ranking may be, but on serving our customers” a Toyota spokeswoman said.

As demand for cars rebounds, particularly in China, Toyota, Volkswagen and other manufacturers are scrambling to tap growing demand for electric cars. Toyota said that the ratio of electric vehicle it sold last year grew to 23% of total sales from 20% in 2019.

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