St. Peter's Basilica reopens to visitors

Saint Peter's Basilica opens its doors to visitors on Monday, marking a relative return to normality at the Vatican and beyond in Italy, where most business activity is set to resume, news wires reported

Public masses also resume throughout the predominantly Catholic country after a two-month hiatus, while restaurants, bars, cafes, shops and hairdressers, among other businesses, are all expected to reopen.

In the face of much opposition, including from Pope Francis, churches in Rome were shuttered at the beginning of the coronavirus emergency in early March. Most, however, opened shortly thereafter, with entry reserved for prayer only.

"I share the joy of those communities who can finally reunite as liturgical assemblies, a sign of hope for all society," Francis said on Sunday during his live-streamed prayer from a chapel at his residence inside the Vatican City. The Argentine pontiff is not yet expected to lead any public religious ceremonies either in the basilica, which can accommodate 60,000 people, or in Saint Peter's Square, as the Vatican seeks to avoid crowds.

Francis will, however, celebrate a private mass on Monday, broadcast by video, in front of the tomb of John Paul II, on the 100th anniversary of the birth of the Polish-born pontiff. In preparation for the reopening of Saint Peter's, the largest Catholic church in the world was disinfected on Friday, with workers in full protective suits and masks spraying down the surface of the 23,000-square metre site. The basilica, as well as three other papal basilicas, is expected to follow a recommendation from Italy's interior ministry limiting attendance at religious celebrations in enclosed places of worship to 200 people.

In Milan, the Duomo cathedral will conduct mass on Monday morning. On Friday, the cathedral said it had introduced gadgets worn around the neck that beep softly, flash and vibrate if visitors approach too closely to one another.

Across Italy's tens of thousands of churches, Catholics will be able to attend not only masses but also weddings and funerals, provided they abide by a series of measures, including wearing masks and sitting or standing well spaced apart.

More on this subject: Coronavirus

Similar articles

  • Joy for UK pubs and hugs tempered by rise in virus variant

    Joy for UK pubs and hugs tempered by rise in virus variant

    Drinks were raised in toasts and reunited friends hugged each other as thousands of UK pubs and restaurants opened Monday for indoor service for the first time since early January. Yet the prime minister sounded a cautious tone, warning about a more contagious COVID-19 variant that threatens reopening plans.

    46
  • Military will help testing in England as Indian Covid variant threatens reopening

    Military will help testing in England as Indian Covid variant threatens reopening

    Britain deployed public health officials, supported by the army, to distribute coronavirus tests door-to-door in two northern England towns on Saturday in an effort to contain a fast-spreading variant that threatens plans to lift all lockdown restrictions next month, AP reported. Cases of a strain first identified in India have more than doubled in a week, defying a sharp nationwide downward trend in infections won by months of restrictions and a rapid vaccination campaign.

    35
  • Heathrow diverts flights to ease pressure

    Heathrow diverts flights to ease pressure

    UK main Heathrow Airport has announced plans to re-direct certain flights to other British airports or even EU hubs to ease pressure of hours waiting on border queues, BBC reported. With mounting paperwork concerning UK arrivals over the last six months, the queues grew longer and now the entry into UK may take as long as 5-6 hours. So far the airport has managed the situation by keeping passengers on the planes to avoid overcrowding on the ground.

    49