Greta Thunberg back for Friday climate protests at Swedish parliament

Photo: Twitter, Greta Thunberg

Following a long spell of online protests, Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg was back in front of the Swedish parliament building on Friday for an in-person protest against climate change.

Together with a handful of other protesters, Thunberg, showcasing her famous sign saying “School strike for climate” and wearing a face mask with the Fridays for Future logo, returned to her original site in Stockholm, as pictures showed that she posted on Instagram and Twitter.

"Today we are back outside the Parliament. But the pandemic is still far from over, so we will continue to keep our numbers as low as possible and act in accordance with local restrictions," she wrote.

Thunberg began staging her one-woman protests in front of Sweden’s parliament building in August 2018, calling on politicians to ramp up the fight against climate change. Within several months, the climate youth movement Fridays for Future was born, sparking mass demonstrations attended by hundreds of thousands of mainly young participants across the globe.

However, the coronavirus pandemic temporarily stopped such large-scale events.

Unable to keep up her Friday protests in person, Thunberg had turned to posting images online of herself holding up her protest sign at home.

In March, she held a sit-in in front of the European Commission’s representation in Stockholm to protest against the EU's agricultural policy and in April she published a picture of herself in a deforested area in central Sweden.

Similar articles

  • Hungary committed to contentious LGBT law

    Hungary committed to contentious LGBT law

    The right-wing populist government in Hungary is attracting conservative thinkers from the United States who admire its approaches to migration, LGBT issues and national sovereignty - all matters that have put the country at odds with its European partners, who see not a conservative haven but a worrying erosion of democratic institutions on multiple fronts. Hungary’s top diplomat has a few things to say about that.

    31
  • German chancellor candidates plead for stronger Europe in final TV debate

    German chancellor candidates plead for stronger Europe in final TV debate

    Sunday elections will be closely watched by Western allies, wary of an uncertain outcome

    The two top candidates running neck-and-neck to replace Angela Merkel as German chancellor called for a stronger European Union on Thursday in a final TV debate that did little to shake up a race expected to end in lengthy coalition negotiations, news wires reported. With days to go before the general election on Sunday that will see Merkel step aside after 16 years in power, her conservative CDU-CSU alliance is playing catch-up with the center-left Social Democrats (SPD) in the polls, narrowing the gap to just 2%.

    41
  • Denmark sides with US against French criticism of defence deal

    Denmark sides with US against French criticism of defence deal

    Denmark is siding with the United States in the dispute with its fellow EU member France over a major Indo-Pacific defense deal, AP reported. PM Mette Frederiksen said in a newspaper interview that she wants to warn against turning “concrete challenges, which will always exist between allies, into something they should not be.” On Tuesday the EU agreed to put the dispute at the top of the bloc’s political agenda.

    41