Google plans to switch to carbon-free energy by 2030

Internet giant Google plans to switch to carbon-free energy in its offices and data centres by 2030, chief executive Sundar Pichai announced on Monday. "We'll do it by purchasing around-the-clock, carbon-free energy everywhere we operate," Pichai said in a video statement.

He said Google would promote technologies for energy production without the emission of carbon dioxide, which contributes to climate change, and "support policies that will create a zero-carbon electricity system."

Google also announced that it would compensate any carbon emitted since its inception in 1998 until 2007, as the company has been carbon-neutral since that year.

Pichai believes no company could solve climate change alone. "That is why we are equally committed to creating tools and investing in technologies to create a carbon-free world," he said.

Google would also invest in its manufacturing regions, creating the capacity to produce five gigawatts of carbon-free energy, and plans to support 500 cities in reducing their carbon emissions, according to the company statement.

The sum of commitments would create over 20,000 jobs in clean energy and associated industries in the United States and the rest of the world by 2025, the company said.

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