G7 three-day summit kicks off with pandemic and climate change on the agenda

It is the leaders' first in-person meeting in this format in two years

Photo: EPA Artist Joe Rush created the 'Mount Recyclemore' sculpture of the G7 leaders inspired by Mount Rushmore. The artwork to be seen at Sandy Acres, St Ives, Cornwall is made from discarded electronics illustrating the growing problem of e-waste.

Leaders of the Group of Major Industrialized Nations (G7) are meeting on Friday for a summit that is overshadowed by the coronavirus pandemic, dpa reported. On the first day, leaders are due to discuss recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, focusing on questions such as Covid-19 vaccine donations and financial aid to build vaccine production sites around the world. Britain's PM Boris Johnson is hosting the three-day summit in the coastal village of Carbis Bay.

In the evening, leaders are scheduled to attend a reception hosted by Queen Elizabeth II and her son, Prince Charles, during which environmental protection and fighting climate change are on the agenda.

It is the leaders' first in-person meeting in this format in two years, after the G7 leaders only met virtually last year due to the pandemic. It is the first major international summit for US President Joe Biden, which he is attending as part of a one-week Europe trip.

The G7 comprises the United States, Britain, Germany, France, Italy, Japan and Canada. On Saturday, the leaders of Australia, India, South Korea and South Africa are invited as guests as well.

 

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