EU rules on removing terrorist propaganda online enter into force

Platforms will have 1 hour to remove content referred by Member States' authorities as terrorist

Photo: EPA VP Margaritis Schinas

Landmark EU rules on addressing terrorist content online entered into force today. Under the new regulation platforms will have to remove terrorist content referred by Member States' authorities within 1 hour.

“With these landmark new rules, we are cracking down on the proliferation of terrorist content online and making the EU's Security Union a reality. From now on, online platforms will have one hour to get terrorist content off the web, ensuring attacks like the one in Christchurch cannot be used to pollute screens and minds. This is a huge milestone in Europe's counter-terrorism and anti-radicalisation response,” VP Margaritis Schinas said.

The rules will also help to counter the spread of extremist ideologies online - a vital part of preventing attacks and addressing radicalisation. The rules include strong safeguards to ensure the full respect of fundamental rights such as freedom of expression and information.

"Taking down terrorist content immediately is crucial to stop terrorists from exploiting the Internet to recruit and encourage attacks and to glorify their crimes. It is equally crucial to protect victims and their families from being confronted with crimes a second time online. The Regulation sets clear rules and responsibilities for Member States and for online platforms, protecting freedom of speech where warranted," Home Affairs Commissioner Ylva Johansson pointed out.

The Regulation will also set transparency obligations for online platforms and for national authorities to report on the amount of terrorist content removed, the measures used to identify and remove content, the outcomes of complaints and appeals, as well as the number and type of penalties imposed on online platforms.

Member States will be able to sanction non-compliance and to decide on the level of penalties, which will be proportionate to the nature of the infringement. The size of the platform will also be taken into consideration, so as to not impose unduly high penalties relative to the platform's size. Member States and online platforms offering services in the EU now have one year to adapt.

Similar articles

  • ECB: Soaring prices are worse than the Covid-19 shock

    ECB: Soaring prices are worse than the Covid-19 shock

    The energy crisis is here to stay for a longer period of time

    The crisis with surging prices of energy sources is worse and will take longer to be resolved compared to the Covid-19 pandemic slowdown and the supply bottlenecks for major industries, European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde said in an interview for CNBC. The Eurozone has been badly impacted, like many other regions worldwide, by disruptions in supply chains brought about by the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent social restrictions.

    43
  • EU dismisses risks from AstraZeneca jabs

    EU dismisses risks from AstraZeneca jabs

    The medicine regulator of the EU (EMA) announced that it could not confirm fears that women and young adults were at a higher risk of rare blood clots with low platelets after vaccination with AstraZeneca's Covid-19 jab. Limitations in the way the data was collected meant that EMA could not identify any specific risk factor that made the condition, thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS), more likely, Reuters reported.

    135
  • Mediterranean countries discuss climate change, migration

    Mediterranean countries discuss climate change, migration

    Nine European Mediterranean countries held a summit in Athens on Friday afternoon to discuss issues ranging from climate change to migration and Afghanistan, news wires reported. The one-day gathering, dubbed the EUMED 9, brings together the leaders of Spain, France, Italy, Malta, Greece, Cyprus, Slovenia and Croatia. Commission head Ursula von der Leyen will also attend the meeting.

    133