EU Member States join to meet cybersecurity needs

All countries commit to build a quantum communication infrastructure

Photo: EPA Margrethe Vestager

All EU Member States have committed to work together, along with the European Commission and the European Space Agency, to build the EuroQCI, a secure quantum communication infrastructure that will span the whole EU. Such high-performing, secure communications networks will be essential to meeting Europe's cybersecurity needs in the years to come, the EC announced.

“I am very happy to see all EU Member States come together to sign the EuroQCI declaration – European Quantum Communication infrastructure initiative - a very solid basis for Europe's plans to become a major player in quantum communications. As such, I encourage them all to be ambitious in their activities, as strong national networks will be the foundation of the EuroQCI,” Margrethe Vestager, Executive Vice-President for a Europe fit for the Digital Age, said.

“As we have recently seen, cybersecurity is more than ever a crucial component of our digital sovereignty. I am very pleased to see that all Member States are now part of the EuroQCI initiative, a key component of our forthcoming secure connectivity initiative, which will allow all Europeans to have access to protected, reliable communication services,” Thierry Breton, Commissioner for Internal Market, added.

The EuroQCI will be part of a wider Commission action to launch a satellite-based secure connectivity system that will make high-speed broadband available everywhere in Europe. This plan will provide reliable, cost-effective connectivity services with enhanced digital security. As such, the EuroQCI will complement existing communication infrastructures with an additional layer of security based on the principles of quantum mechanics - for example, by providing services based on quantum key distribution, a highly secure form of encryption.

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