Canada green-lights the return of Boeing 737 Max

Photo: EPA

The 737 Max model aircrafts made by Boeing may resume flights in Canada as the country waived a two year ban effective 20 Jan., following two crashes that lead to hundreds of fatalities, Reuters said. The Boeing 737 Max fleet has been grounded worldwide for the past two years.

The Canadian Transport Administration noted that the aircrafts are allowed to fly provided they meet specific requirements, including allowing pilots to disable a faulty warning system that was found to be central to two deadly crashes in 2018 and 2019.

“Canadians and the airline industry can rest assured that Transport Canada has diligently addressed all safety issues prior to permitting this aircraft to return to service in Canadian airspace,” Transport Minister Omar Alghabra said in a statement.

The planes have been grounded since March 2019 following the crashes of a Lion Air flight near Jakarta on 29 October 2018, and an Ethiopian Airlines flight on 10 March 2019, killing a total of 346 people. Investigators determined that the cause of the crashes was a faulty computer system that pushed the plane’s nose downward in flight and couldn’t be overridden by pilots.

Boeing admitted in court filings that two of its technical pilot experts deceived the U.S. FAA about a flight-control system called the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, or MCAS, that could point a plane’s nose down if sensors indicated the plane might be in danger of an aerodynamic stall — that it might fall from the sky.

The system was not part of previous 737 models. MCAS was added because the Max’s larger engines, which are mounted higher and farther forward on the 737’s low-swept wings, gave the plane a tendency to tilt too far nose-up in some conditions.

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