Boeing resumes production of 737 MAX planes

Boeing has resumed production of the 737 MAX at a "low" rate following two deadly crashes that killed 346 people and led to the aircraft's global grounding by regulators, news wires reported. The company on Wednesday said work on the MAX had resumed at its Renton, Washington, factory as it implements initiatives to enhance workplace safety and product quality.

The jet hasn't flown commercially since March 2019 and is still a number of key steps away from being cleared for service by the US Federal Aviation Administration and other regulators.

"We've been on a continuous journey to evolve our production system and make it even stronger," Walt Odisho, vice president and general manager of the 737 programme said. The aerospace giant had shut production in January amid uncertainty over when regulators would clear the jet to fly again.

Even before the hit from the coronavirus, the MAX crisis had cost Boeing billions of dollars in compensation for airlines and production expenses, including the cost to store more than 400 planes that could not be delivered to customers. Since that time, Boeing's troubles have deepened due to coronavirus shutdowns. On Tuesday, Boeing released details on a downsizing plan to cut total headcount by 10%, or roughly 16,000 employees in all.

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