Bernie Sanders drops out of 2020 democratic race for president

Sanders withdraws after a series of losses to Joseph R. Biden Jr. - a now presumptive nominee for the general election

Bernie Sanders

Bernie Sanders is ending his second bid for the presidency, the campaign staff was informed on a conference call Wednesday morning, according to campaign sources. Sanders then told supporters in a live stream that the decision to end his campaign was "very difficult and painful", and acknowledged some of his supporters would have wished him to fight until the last state contest.

"If I believed we had a feasible path to the nomination, I would certainly continue," he said.

Still, Sanders stressed that the campaign has "transformed American consciousness as to what kind of nation we can become and have taken this country a major step forward in the never-ending struggle for economic justice, social justice, racial justice and environmental justice". He also noted that across the country, his campaign received "a significant majority of the votes...from people not only 30 years or younger, but 50 years or younger".

"The future of this country is with our ideas," he continued.

The Vermont Senator also congratulated former Vice President and main travel in the Democratic race Joe Biden, and said that he will work with him to "move our progressive ideas forward".

The senator added that he will still be on ballots in states that have yet to vote in the Democratic primary elections, in order to gather delegates and influence the party's general election platform at the convention.

"Together, standing united, we will go forward to defeat Donald Trump, the most dangerous president in modern American history."

Sanders’s departure from the race comes a day after the state of Wisconsin went forward with a controversial in-person election, which Sanders had called to be postponed. The Vermont senator was momentarily the frontrunner for the nomination, following a popular-vote win in Iowa, a win in New Hampshire, and a decisive victory in Nevada.  His chances, however, fell apart in South Carolina, where the dean of the state party, Rep. Jim Clyburn, gave an impassioned endorsement to Biden. A race that had been narrowing turned into a blowout.

Sanders’s exit now is a boost for Biden, particularly as it relates to campaign finance. Without a primary opponent, he can move more quickly to the general election phase of the race, during which he can spend money raised for that purpose. Had the contest gone all the way to the August convention without Biden having locked up the necessary delegates, he would be restricted to his scarce primary funds only. It’s not entirely clear when Biden can tap general election funds, and lawyers are working to move the date up as much as possible, sources said.

Similar articles