Art in lockdown: Rats causing mayhem in Banksy’s bathroom

Banksy, the elusive anonymous artist, who usually works in the street, revealed his latest work in lockdown – a series of rats causing mayhem in his bathroom. He posted the images on his Instagram on Wednesday night, with the caption: “My wife hates it when I work from home.”

The rats, which have featured in many of his previous artworks, are presented as knocking the bathroom mirror to one side, hanging on the light pull, swinging on a towel ring and stepping on a tube of toothpaste. One rat is seen skipping on a roll of toilet paper, which has rolled down and across the floor.

 

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