Airline body IATA develops mobile apps for COVID-era travel

Global aviation body IATA is developing a set of mobile apps to help passengers to navigate COVID-19 travel restrictions and securely share test and vaccine certificates with airlines and governments, it said on Monday.

The International Air Transport Association (IATA), which represents many of the world’s major airlines, plans to pilot the Travel Pass platform by year-end and deploy it for Android and Apple iOS phones in the first half of next year.

Airlines are pressing governments to replace traffic-stifling quarantine requirements with systematic COVID-19 testing, with some success.

“Our main priority is to get people travelling again safely,” IATA security chief Nick Careen said. “That means giving governments confidence that systematic COVID-19 testing can work as a replacement for quarantine requirements.”

Passenger health and other data are not stored centrally but authenticated with blockchain, leaving consumers in control of what they share, IATA said.

A new “Contactless Travel” app will combine passport information with test and vaccination certificates received from participating labs. It will also draw on global registries of health requirements and testing and vaccination centres.

The platform is built on open source standards to help interoperability with existing systems including its member airlines’ own customer apps, IATA said.

Similar articles

  • Ireland’s Ryanair aims to hire 5,000 new staff

    Ireland’s Ryanair aims to hire 5,000 new staff

    Irish airline Ryanair said on Thursday that it’s planning to create 5,000 jobs over the next five years as part of its recovery from the shock of the coronavirus pandemic, AP reported. The additional pilots, cabin crew and engineers will mean that the company will have more than recouped the 3,000 jobs it got rid of at the start of the pandemic last year. CEO Michael O’Leary said the carrier has been snapping up slots that have been vacated by airlines that have either collapsed or retrenched over the past 18 months or so.

    53
  • US passes $10bn high speed rails bill

    US passes $10bn high speed rails bill

    US House of Representatives will vote next week on new legislation that envisages some $10 billion in government help for high-speed-rail corridors. The House Transportation and Infrastructure proposal also includes another 10 billion dollars to support mobility for low-income Americans, including establishing new transit routes and funding for a fare-free service. The money is expected to be part of a $3.5 trillion government spending bill, Reuters reported.

    66
  • Australia sells Sydney Airport for $17.4bn

    Australia sells Sydney Airport for $17.4bn

    Australia holds talks with strategic investors in a bid to sell its biggest airport. The expected value of the transaction for the Sydney Airport is some 17.4 billion dollars, Reuters reported. The buyer is an infrastructure investor group which won permission to conduct due diligence after depositing weetening its takeover offer.

    75