Tsvetan Vassilev's Russian ties traced back to CorpBank's vault

Bulgarian Madoff continues to hand out envelopes with the stolen money

Tsvetan Vassilev

Tsvetan Vassilev's strong Russian connections reared their ugly head from the witness testimonies in the CorpBank embezzlement case. Even Capital, the flagship of the Fake News Factory coordinated by oligarch Ivo Prokopiev, failed to cover them up and actually inadvertently exposed them.

Tsvetan Vassilev's strong Russian connections reared their ugly head from the witness testimonies in the CorpBank embezzlement case. Even Capital, the flagship of the Fake News Factory coordinated by oligarch Ivo Prokopiev, failed to cover them up and actually inadvertently exposed them. In its latest issue, the newspaper attempted to once again lead the public on a wild-goose chase with a manipulative article loosely based on testimonies taken during the court case looking into the draining of CorpBank.
Prokopiev's media outlet tried to steer the focus to various political and public figures alleged in the testimonies to have been receiving envelopes with money from the vault of the lender whose failure was engineered by the Bulgarian Madoff. But some names are purposefully highlighted, while others are glossed over.
Meanwhile, Vassilev's correspondence that we published a week ago shows that his shady practice of paying people with envelopes full of money stolen from CorpBank, and directing the fate of assets he owns behind the scenes, is alive and well. Even while hiding in Belgrade, Vassilev continues to play the innocent and asks about where different properties and companies acquired with CorpBank depositors' money are, whilst he is issuing instructions on the management of these same companies and on who should be paid in the process.
In order to meet its daily quota of fake news items about Delyan Peevski, Capital involves his name at various points in the article, making him seem as being mentioned in witness testimonies, without him actually having been cited in them. Following the classic recipe of cooking up fake news, Capital quotes testimonies and every several paragraphs inserts, without any logic, the name of our publisher. This is all based on talking points that Vassilev himself laid out in his ridiculous four-hour interview with an obscure blogger. In the absence of any supporting evidence, Capital perpetuates the shameless lie that Peevski was, for all intents and purposes, sponsored with CorpBank money. Shortly after the lender was placed under special supervision by the Bulgarian National Bank, a document was disclosed attesting to the fact that Delyan Peevski had no outstanding loans or deposits in the bank embezzled by Vassilev. His family also had been diligent in repaying its loans and had no outstanding debt at the time. The family also does not own any assets subject to lawsuits linked to the bank's bankruptcy proceeding. Capital completely contradicted itself by simultaneously claiming that Peevski was not mentioned in the witness testimonies, and that he was revealed to have illegally benefited from CorpBank. This is a classic way of creating fake news.
Ivo Prokopiev made sad work of his attempt to make Tsvetan Vassilev a favour by actually shining light on the latter's Russian ties. Albeit cursorily, the name of the agent of Russian influence Nikolay Malinov was mentioned in the quoted testimonies. The allegations regarding people inconvenient to Prokopiev are described in great detail, but Malinov is only mentioned in a quote about bank teller Yulia Ilieva's claim that she gave money to Malinov on two or three occasions directly from the vault in 2013. He was reached for comment only to state his denial and was described in the article as the publisher of the newspaper Duma, even though in the year in question Nikolay Malinov was a lawmaker. As we have repeatedly written, Malinov is a long-time head of the Russophiles National Movement, an ardent supporter of the Kremlin's foreign policy, and the connection between Tsvetan Vassilev and the so-called Orthodox oligarch Konstantin Malofeev. It was Malofeev with whom Vassilev tried to make a deal to split the big-ticket assets acquired with CorpBank depositors' money - like the Bulgarian Telecommunications Company, NURTS and Avionams - through the Russian oligarch's henchmen Pierre Louvrier and Dmitry Kosarev. Following the collapse of CorpBank, Nikolay Malinov himself played a major part in one of the attempts to put a hand on TV7, the network funded with CorpBank money, and turn it into a mouthpiece of the Russian propaganda in Bulgaria.

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