Metallica receives Polar Music Prize

Carl XVI Gustaf, the King of Sweden, presented Metallica and Afghani­stan's National Institute of Music with Sweden's prestigious Polar Music Prize for 2018 at a ceremony in Stockholm on 14 June, reports BTA.

Carl XVI Gustaf, the King of Sweden, presented Metallica and Afghani­stan's National Institute of Music with Sweden's prestigious Polar Music Prize for 2018 at a ceremony in Stockholm on 14 June, reports BTA. It is the first time a heavy metal band gets the award given out each year for significant achievements in music. The award panel said Metallica had “through virtuoso ensemble playing and its use of extremely accelerated tempos” taken rock music “to places it had never been before”. Metallica is among the world's most successful bands, with over 110m copies sold. 
The panel has also noted that the Afghan institute “revives Afghan music, and shows you can transform lives through music”. It was represented at the award ceremony by its founder, Dr. Ahmad Sarmast. 
The Polar Music Prize was established in 1989 by Stig Anderson, manager of the famous ABBA, and is accompanied by a cash prize of 1m kronor ($124,000).

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