EU extends sanctions over Crimea and Sevastopol by one year

Резюме

The Council of the EU last Monday extended the restrictive measures in response to the illegal annexation of Crimea and Sevastopol by Russia until 23 June 2019. Applied to EU persons and EU-based companies, they are limited to the territory of Crimea and Sevastopol. The sanctions include prohibitions on imports into the EU of products originating in Crimea or Sevastopol, as well as investment and financing there. Exports of certain goods and technologies to Crimean companies or for use in Crimea, as well as supplying tourist services there, are also subjected to sanctions.

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