South Korea

    • Boosting is now illegal in South Korea

      Boosting is now illegal in South Korea

      South Korea has officially declared that it is a criminal offence to offer boosting services in video games. According to the new law that will go into effect in around six months from now, boosting is described as an “act that interferes with a game’s normal operations by providing the service to acquire points or achievements in a way that is not approved by the game business operator”. In layman’s terms, the practice involves playing on a low-skilled player's account to artificially boost their ranking - often for a fee.

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    • Two Koreas to remove weapons at border

      Two Koreas to remove weapons at border

      North and South Korea agreed on Monday to withdraw firearms and guard posts in the demilitarised zone village of Panmunjom - the "truce town" that straddles their border. The move comes shortly after troops from both sides started removing about 800,000 landmines buried along the border with the aim of reducing tension between the two countries. The announcement also comes amid expressed US concerns that the inter-Korean military initiative could undermine defense readiness.

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    • North Korea estimated to have up to 60 nuclear weapons

      North Korea estimated to have up to 60 nuclear weapons

      Estimates on the size of North Korea's nuclear arsenal range from 20 bombs to as many as 60. Furthermore Pyongyang is believed to have produced another 50kg of weaponised plutonium, enough for 8 bombs, the South's unification minister Cho Myoung-gyon told parliament on Monday, marking the first time Seoul has made public remarks about the size of the Pyongyang’s secretive haul of atomic weapons, citing intelligence authorities.

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    • North, South Korea vow to end war

      North, South Korea vow to end war

      South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un declared they had made a major step toward peace on the Korean Peninsula during their third summit, signing a comprehensive set of agreements. The two leaders stood side by side after their second day of talks in Pyongyang as they announced the concrete moves they have made to bring peace to the Korean Peninsula once and for all - something they first committed to at their April summit.

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    • Inter-Korean summit starts today

      Inter-Korean summit starts today

      North Korean leader Kim Jong Un greeted South Korean President Moon Jae-in on his arrival in Pyongyang Tuesday for their third summit this year, as the two countries look to establish peace on the Korean Peninsula. The two leaders smiled and hugged at the foot of Moon's plane at Sunan International Airport, amid crowds of cheering North Koreans waving flowers and national flags, including those symbolizing a unified Korean Peninsula. The highly choreographed arrival was the first time Kim had greeted visitors at the airport since the young North Korean leader took power in 2011.

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    • North, South Korea agree on summit in Pyongyang

      North, South Korea agree on summit in Pyongyang

      The leaders of North and South Korea will hold a second summit in Pyongyang in September, both countries announced Monday. The upcoming summit marks the third in-person meeting between South Korean leader Moon Jae-in and his North Korean counterpart Kim Jong Un. The two first met in April, pledging to forge closer relations and work to formally end the Korean War in an agreement called the Panmunjom Declaration. They then held an impromptu meeting in May at the demilitarized zone that divides the two Koreas.

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