Analysis


    • Three coronavirus questions that science hasn’t answered with certainty

      Three coronavirus questions that science hasn’t answered with certainty

      Relatively early in the coronavirus outbreak, many experts thought that people who clearly showed COVID-19 symptoms—coughing, sneezing, fever, and breathing problems—were the ones most likely to spread the disease. On 28 January, Anthony Fauci, the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and one of the most prominent faces of the US government pandemic response said, “the driver of outbreaks is always a symptomatic person, even if there’s a rare asymptomatic person that might transmit.”

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    • Life goes on in The Land of the Morning Calm

      Life goes on in The Land of the Morning Calm

      Seoul’s Gwanghwamun Plaza, usually bustling with tourists saying “Kimchi” and snapping photos in front of King Sejong’s statue, is eerily empty today. Thanks to the Korean Wave craze, The Land of The Morning Calm has enjoyed a steady rise in the number of foreign tourists over the past decade, averaging to 17 million in 2019. But once South Korea announced its first cases of the Coronavirus pandemic in late January, the world slowly started turning its back on the Asian country, with tourists cancelling their long-awaited trips to the K-pop mecca, opting to watch Korean drama at home, instead.

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    • Humanity, politics and politicians in Covid times

      Humanity, politics and politicians in Covid times

      People are singing from the balconies in Italy and Iran. Others are clapping from their windows, playing bingo or volunteering to serve in health services. In local communities, citizens are delivering essentials for the vulnerable and elderly. These are echoes of the human spirit as old as time. Isn’t it interesting that people and communities have crossed the borders of their apartments and their streets, beyond their Wifi, to connect with each other whilst EU leaders find supporting each other so difficult?

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    • Why there are so many different guidelines for face masks

      Why there are so many different guidelines for face masks

      On 29 February, the US surgeon general Dr. Jerome Adams tweeted that masks do not offer any benefit to the average citizen. "They are NOT effective in preventing general public from catching #Coronavirus, but if healthcare providers can’t get them to care for sick patients, it puts them and our communities at risk!," his tweet read. 

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    • Sweden goes it alone

      Sweden goes it alone

      In Berlin, we are supposed to stay at home but some (physical) exercise is still allowed. So, I spent some time the other day walking around and gazing at the closed shops and the deserted playground in my neighbourhood – and my mind naturally wandered to Sweden, where I lived for many years. The country seems like paradise relative to grim, locked-down Germany: open cafés, happy children playing with their fathers, and groups of people working on the waterfront.

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    • Outdoor sport in times of COVID-19 - safe or not?

      Outdoor sport in times of COVID-19 - safe or not?

      Because of the urgency of the situation and the world‐wide COVID-19 crisis, we exceptionally have turned things upside down, even though in a lot of countries walking, biking, cycling and jogging are still welcome activities. However, it is important to note that you need to avoid each other's slipstream when doing these activities. 

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    • Could life ever be sane again

      Could life ever be sane again

      Londoners are known for flooding the parks on a typical Sunday afternoon when the sun is happening to be shining occasionally. Thousands of people are having picknicks, playing games or just enjoying the day with their friends and families. Greenwich park is full of tourists and locals per usual and everyone pretends things are fine.

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