Analysis


    • EU is struggling to show solidarity in face of ‘existential’ crisis

      EU is struggling to show solidarity in face of ‘existential’ crisis

      The EU’s response to COVID-19 has given plenty of ammunition to its opponents. Frontiers have been closed and supply chains broken as countries have put their own needs first. Trust among governments has diminished, with France and Germany banning medical exports in the early days of the crisis, to the fury of Italy, while the long-running north-south rift over the future of the eurozone risks widening into a dangerous chasm.

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    • How to keep nuclear power plants secure during the pandemic

      How to keep nuclear power plants secure during the pandemic

      As the COVID-19 pandemic devastates the world, nuclear power plants must remain safe and secure to provide electricity for food supply chains, emergency response teams, hospitals, and telecommunications in countries home to more than half of all people. Meanwhile, the Islamic State terror group has already announced its intent to exploit the pandemic, and other violent extremist organizations are also taking pains to use the crisis for their own purposes.

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    • The EU must rise from the ashes of the Coronacrisis

      The EU must rise from the ashes of the Coronacrisis

      Ahead of today’s vote in the European Parliament on a strong resolution to set the tone for the meeting of Heads of state and government next week and in light of the solid package of measures proposed on 9 April by the Eurogroup to support the European economy, I am confident the EU has now more than ever the chance and the obligation to rise from its ashes like the Phoenix.

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    • We cannot overcome such pandemic without the truth

      We cannot overcome such pandemic without the truth

      Dear President, Honourable Members, there are no words that can do justice to Europe's pain or to all those suffering across the world. We think and we pray for all of the families in mourning. And we promise to each other that we will tell their stories and honour their lives and their legacies.

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    • Hunger for 'good news' grows as pandemic woes deepen

      Hunger for 'good news' grows as pandemic woes deepen

      Battered by grim headlines, horrifying statistics and deep uncertainty over the coronavirus pandemic, many people worldwide are trying to lift their spirits by seeking out "good news." Sites specialising in upbeat news have seen a surge in growth in recent weeks. And Google searches for "good news" have jumped fivefold since the start of the year.

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    • When a coronavirus vaccine will finally be developed?

      When a coronavirus vaccine will finally be developed?

      When will we have a Covid-19 vaccine? Some like the UK’s chief scientific adviser, Sir Patrick Vallance, and his US counterpart, Anthony Fauci, keep repeating that it won’t be before 12 to 18 months from now. Other voices, including some of those in the race to create a vaccine, have suggested that it could be as early as June. Who is right?

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    • Three coronavirus questions that science hasn’t answered with certainty

      Three coronavirus questions that science hasn’t answered with certainty

      Relatively early in the coronavirus outbreak, many experts thought that people who clearly showed COVID-19 symptoms—coughing, sneezing, fever, and breathing problems—were the ones most likely to spread the disease. On 28 January, Anthony Fauci, the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and one of the most prominent faces of the US government pandemic response said, “the driver of outbreaks is always a symptomatic person, even if there’s a rare asymptomatic person that might transmit.”

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    • Life goes on in The Land of the Morning Calm

      Life goes on in The Land of the Morning Calm

      Seoul’s Gwanghwamun Plaza, usually bustling with tourists saying “Kimchi” and snapping photos in front of King Sejong’s statue, is eerily empty today. Thanks to the Korean Wave craze, The Land of The Morning Calm has enjoyed a steady rise in the number of foreign tourists over the past decade, averaging to 17 million in 2019. But once South Korea announced its first cases of the Coronavirus pandemic in late January, the world slowly started turning its back on the Asian country, with tourists cancelling their long-awaited trips to the K-pop mecca, opting to watch Korean drama at home, instead.

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