Analysis


    • The EU will play a greater global role post-Corona

      The EU will play a greater global role post-Corona

      Pundits in the noisy Covid-19 debate divide broadly into two schools of thought. There are those who think the pandemic will be so short that they argue over ways to soften its impact, and others who see it as a global game changer. Sadly, the latter increasingly looks the more likely, with major implications for everyone.

      9
    • Key word: solidarity

      Key word: solidarity

      From the start of the pandemic one word has taken over the entire world, and particularly Europe. This word is solidarity. It's been said every hour, even every minute - repeated by frightened prime ministers and presidents, exhausted from constant explanations heads of crisis response centres set up especially to fight the coronavirus, by top officials and police brass who provide logistic support, by medical professionals with clouded minds from lack of sleep and deficit of medicines and equipment.

      32
    • Pandemics are endemic in human history

      Pandemics are endemic in human history

      Man and disease go hand in hand from the very early steps of human civilisation. Excavations in many Neolithic settlements across the globe reveal signs of devastating epidemics, sometimes resulting in abandoning the village altogether, or the decimation of its entire population. Yet, few epidemics turned to become pandemics raging so wildly that the final outcome was a significant change of the history of mankind.

      59
    • School's out: What the pandemic means for millions of youngsters

      School's out: What the pandemic means for millions of youngsters

      School pupils across the globe have been asked to stay at home while their governments battle with the coronavirus pandemic. For some, this might come as an extended vacation; for others, their qualifications and future plans are at stake - or worse, their next meal. DPA looks at the new reality for hundreds of millions of children and teenagers:

      11
    • How the pandemic will end

      How the pandemic will end

      Three months ago, no one knew that SARS-CoV-2 existed. Now the virus has spread to almost every country, infecting at least 446,000 people whom we know about, and many more whom we do not. It has crashed economies and broken health-care systems, filled hospitals and emptied public spaces. It has separated people from their workplaces and their friends. It has disrupted modern society on a scale that most living people have never witnessed. 

      65
    • The virus that kills trust in the EU is no less dangerous

      The virus that kills trust in the EU is no less dangerous

      A virus of yet unknown origin has put mighty Europe into an intensive-care ward, struggling for breath on artificial ventilation. It's hard to believe but this same Europe, which has launched a multibillion-euro programme for space research and a similarly expensive AI development programme, all of a sudden woke up to a deficit of medical masks and protective gear for medical professionals, without enough beds in hospitals and short of medical personnel. And no satellites were needed to see that.

      44
    • Close the churches! Right now!

      Close the churches! Right now!

      This is unbelievable - the Bulgarian Orthodox Church is still planning on holding Easter services. Never mind the pandemic, the declared state of emergency, the massive health risk to both the congregation and the priests.

      55
    • Will the coronavirus kill democracy?

      Will the coronavirus kill democracy?

      The world will never be the same once the coronavirus crisis is over. A sentence like this can be read or heard in every second analysis or interview on the topic, across the globe, on a daily basis. Few dare to enter deeper into details and elaborate on what the differences from the pre-coronavirus situation will be eventually.

      94