Tusk accuses Trump of being averse to a strong Europe

He warns of rising anti-EU sentiment ahead of EP elections

The EU Council President Donald Tusk on Saturday accused US President Donald Trump of being averse to a "strong and united" Europe and also warned against the emergence of a "brownshirt" nationalist front in EU elections next year, news wires reported.

His comments came as Trump, in France for World War I centenary commemorations, blasted French President Emmanuel Macron over his proposals for a European army."For the first time in history we have an American adminstration that is, to put it mildly, not enthusiastic about a united and strong Europe," Tusk said in a speech in his native Poland on the eve of celebrations to mark Poland's 100th anniversary of independence. He has previously voiced fears that Trump was seeking to tear down the post World War II order, with the US leader once calling the EU a foe in trade. In an interview published Saturday by the Polish newspaper Gazeta Wyborcza, Tusk also said he believed Trump wanted a world with "the US on one side and on the other, a disparate collection of other countries".

Looking ahead to the EP elections in May, Tusk warned against the emergency of a nationalist front opposed to the EU itself. "It cannot be ruled out that there will be two streams represented: one in the colours of the brownshirts -- anti-European and focused on nationalism, and the second which wants to push as much as possible for EU integration."

The former Polish PM also spoke of rising anti-European sentiment in several capitals. Without naming names, Tusk criticised Polish leaders for their stance on Europe, after this week warning that the eurosceptic ruling party's policies carried the risk of a "Polexit".

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