Theresa May asks for Brexit delay until 30 June

British Theresa May has asked the EU for a short extension of the Brexit deadline until 30 June. In a letter to EU leaders sent last Wednesday May requested for a three month delay. “As prime minister I am not prepared to delay Brexit any further than the 30th of June,” she told MPs in Parliament. “I have therefore this morning written to EC President Donald Tusk, informing him that the UK seeks an extension to the Article 50”.

May also said she would ask Parliament to vote once again on her withdrawal deal, but did not say when the vote would take place. British MPs have twice rejected May's painstakingly negotiated agreement with Brussels.

But it's unclear whether EU officials will accept a deadline after European parliamentary elections in May. In the lead-up to a crucial leaders' summit in Brussels, EU officials have voiced frustration over the political deadlock in Britain and concern that a delay would make Brexit coincide with European parliamentary elections in May.

The European Commission believes delaying Brexit until June 30 would entail "serious legal and political risks," according to an internal briefing for EU leaders. “Any extension offered to the United Kingdom should either last until 23 May 2019 or should be significantly longer and require European elections,” the document said. “This is the only way of protecting the functioning of the EU institutions and their ability to take decisions.”

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