Oettinger calls for French ECB head after Draghi

Commissioner Guenther Oettinger entered last week the debate about the next European Central bank president after Mario Draghi's term expires in October 2019. In his words it would be perfect for the EU and the Eurozone if a Frenchman was installed at the ECB helm.

“It would be best to have a German European Commission President and a clever Frenchman as head of the ECB,” business daily Handelsblatt cited Oettinger as saying. Manfed Weber, a German, is the leading candidate to take into Juncker's steps.

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