May will bring Brexit deal back to parliament mid-January

Lawmakers accuse the PM of trying to force the parliament into backing the agreement by running the clock down to exit day

British PM Theresa May confirmed last Monday she would bring her Brexit deal back to parliament for a mid-January vote, pledging to get assurances from the EU before then to break a deadlock, news wires reported. A mid-January vote could oblige lawmakers to make a decision between her deal or leaving without one on 29 March.

With just over 100 days until Britain is due to leave the EU, May faced accusations from some lawmakers that she was trying to force a deeply divided parliament into backing her deal by running the clock down to exit day. May is pressing on with her deal to leave the EU, rejecting calls for a second referendum or to test support for different Brexit options in parliament, despite hardening opposition to the agreement to maintain close ties. 

May said parliament would debate the deal in January, before a vote in the week beginning 14 January, more than a month after an original Dec. 11 vote which she cancelled after admitting she faced a significant defeat. After a tumultuous week in which she survived a confidence vote within her Conservative Party and sought last-minute changes to the Brexit agreement reached with Brussels last month, May said again that the alternatives to her deal were leaving without an agreement or no Brexit at all. 

“I know this is not everyone's perfect deal. It is a compromise. But if we let the perfect be the enemy of the good then we risk leaving the EU with no deal,” she told lawmakers, her speech punctuated by loud shouts of protest. “Avoiding no deal is only possible if we can reach an agreement or if we abandon Brexit entirely,” she added.

 

More on this subject: Brexit

Similar articles

  • British PM in hectic search of a Brexit solution

    British PM in hectic search of a Brexit solution

    The House of Commons Speaker's decision caused constitutional crisis

    British PM Theresa May's Brexit plans were once again thrown in disarray on Tuesday after parliament's Speaker John Bercow denied putting her Brexit deal for a third vote after it was defeated twice by MPs. According to him, this could happen only after the PM changes her proposal substantially. Bercow said his ruling, based on a convention dating back to 1604, did not prevent the government reshaping its proposition, or securing a vote in parliament to override his ruling.

    8
  • La Scala will return controversial Saudi funding

    La Scala will return controversial Saudi funding

    La Scala will give back to Saudi investors over three million euros paid on condition of getting a member on the board of the iconic Milanese opera house, Milan Mayor and La Scala President Giuseppe Sala announced on Monday. "Back to square one. We'll return the money to the Saudis," Sala said, adding that the board had voted "unanimously" to refund over €3 million received so far.

    12
  • Salvini: Migrants rescued by NGO won't enter Italy

    Salvini: Migrants rescued by NGO won't enter Italy

    Italy's Deputy Premier and Interior Minister Matteo Salvini said on Tuesday that 49 asylum seekers rescued in the Mediterranean by an NGO-run ship flying the Italian flag will not be allowed to enter Italy. "They can be treated, dressed and fed," League leader Salvini told SkyTg24. "We can give them any kind of comfort but they will not set foot in Italy with my permission".

    9