Bulgarian Madoff dyes his Russian ties

Tsvetan Vassilev

Fugitive banker Tsvetan Vassilev tried to hide his Russian ties recently, much like he hides his white hair with henna. In the spirit of our article “A leopard can’t change its spots”, Vassilev had a frenetic video session on the internet, an interview with which he subjected viewers to a lowly propaganda treatment of lies and yet the only thing he undeniably managed to show is that he has dyed his hair. Aside from sporting a new hair colour, which quickly turned into the main topic of internet forum comments, Tsvetan Vassilev also unsuccessfully tried to don an anti-Russian camouflage.

Fugitive banker Tsvetan Vassilev tried to hide his Russian ties recently, much like he hides his white hair with henna. In the spirit of our article “A leopard can’t change its spots”, Vassilev had a frenetic video session on the internet, an interview with which he subjected viewers to a lowly propaganda treatment of lies and yet the only thing he undeniably managed to show is that he has dyed his hair. 
Aside from sporting a new hair colour, which quickly turned into the main topic of internet forum comments, Tsvetan Vassilev also unsuccessfully tried to don an anti-Russian camouflage. 
The central themes of what was essentially a monologue, which went on for a whopping four and a half hours, were the absurd claim under the Magnitsky Act that Vassilev filed with the US Department of State and his attempts to pass himself as a person with strong US connections. However, his ties with the Russian oligarchy, as represented by Konstantin Malofeev, Dmitry Kosarev, Igor Girkin-Strelkov and Nikolay Malinov, are as thick as hawsers. Whatever nonsense Vassilev was spinning under the idolatrous look in the eyes of the interviewer, the fugitive banker could not avoid admitting to having met Malofeev. It was with the oligarch in question that Vassilev agreed on a way to split the assets acquired with CorpBank money that were targeted for plundering. First, he tried to put a hand on them using the “€1 Gang” led by Malofeev’s puppet Pierre Louvrier. Then he struck a shameful deal with the other figurehead of the Russian oligarch – Dmitry Kosarev. 
At the same time, despite multiple viewer questions, the topic of Vassilev’s connection to the Russian agent in Bulgaria Nikolay Malinov was never broached. “Was a loan of BGN 900,000 given to the “Russophiles” National Movement to ostensibly fund ‘procurement of paper’?” was the specific question asked multiple times in the comments to no avail. However, the fact that Tsvetan Vassilev is a sponsor of and an associate in all Russian projects in Bulgaria cannot be concealed.       
As a whole, this public appearance by Tsvetan Vassilev can be described with a paraphrase of a popular theatre play that would sound like The Moustache Monologues. 
For four hours and twenty-six minutes Vassilev was supposed to answer the questions of the audience, but the servile presenter diligently filtered the questions choosing only those in favour of the talking points of the Bulgarian Madoff. And those have been long known: CorpBank was a prosperous bank, Delyan Peevski and “his grouping” made it bankrupt, they had outstanding loans to the bank, etc, etc. These are long refuted lies, but Vassilev reproduces them once and again desperately trying to evade justice. In a state of exultation, off type for an early morning interview, Tsvetan Vassilev boastfully arrogated all kinds of exploits to himself. 
In his words, during the 1990’s he saved a certain bank. Later on, when all foreign investors were scared stiff, he employed his genius moves and grew rich. Vassilev claims that he saved form failure energy plants, industry and the entire Bulgarian economy, which, in his words, did not cease to exist only thanks to the visionary banker. He was so carried away by the sound of his own voice and servile attitude of the interviewer that it lent wings to him, so big that he dared air his expert opinion even about the turbo folk music genre in Serbia and the sway it holds over Bulgarian chalga (pop-folk).  All these are table talk topics over a glass (or more) of aged whiskey.        
It transpired that Tsvetan Vassilev lives in a parallel world, as exposed by his inevitable comment about his relationships with Ivan Kostov, who planted him in CorpBank during his premiership. The Bulgarian Madoff had the face to explain that he met Kostov on numerous occasions, but the two only exchanged opinions and he subscribed to the services of the Risk Analyses and Management Center ran by Kostov. The fact that Kostov and his family had deposits in CorpBank worth of nearly BGN 500,000 under preferential conditions, a circumstance revealed in the reports by the CorpBank bankruptcy administrators, was omitted. The donations to the Democracy Foundation and the fact that the party subsidy of the Democrats for Strong Bulgaria (DSB) was deposited in the lender were not mentioned either. The scandalously high fees worth of BGN 300,000 that a shell company financed by CorpBank paid to Kostov’s daughter Mina were also left out. Winding up, we can say that Kostov was not only a frequent guest of Tsvetan Vassilev, but also received money from the CorpBank via his children.

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