Anti-corruption commission confirms: Delyan Peevski's money is clear

Delyan Peevski

All revenues of the MP of the Movement for Rights and Freedoms and our publisher Delyan Peevski are beyond suspicion while he and his businesses have been a subject to audit from 2003 onwards. Peevski himself is rated among the largest taxpayers in Bulgaria and reports against him have been terminated due to the absence of elements of crime. This was established during the last of many inspections, which this time was performed by the new Corruption Combat and Illegal Assets Forfeiture Commission.

All revenues of the MP of the Movement for Rights and Freedoms and our publisher Delyan Peevski are beyond suspicion while he and his businesses have been a subject to audit from 2003 onwards. Peevski himself is rated among the largest taxpayers in Bulgaria and reports against him have been terminated due to the absence of elements of crime. This was established during the last of many inspections, which this time was performed by the new Corruption Combat and Illegal Assets Forfeiture Commission.
It was launched following a report “that cites no concrete facts about a committed crime”, according to Plamen Georgiev, head of the anti-corruption commission. The report was sent by the Boets non-profit organisation financed by the Bulgarian Madoff. The association’s head Georgi Georgiev, who likes to take photos alongside fugitive banker Tsvetan Vassilev, tried to stir a scandal and a week ago publicly accused the Commission that it refuses to investigate the MP. It turns out that the Corruption Combat and Illegal Assets Forfeiture Commission has conducted an investigation and its results were presented at a news conference. This, however, was done as late as 14 June, after Peevski himself called for making the data public to stop speculations with his name. The Commission’s chair and its three members held a briefing session where they reported on their activity and perspectives. 
During the press conference, it was revealed that two reports against Peevski had been filed with the Commission. One is the ineptly patched-up report by Boets which refers to income of undeclared origin and illegal termination of prosecutors’ inspections of the lawmaker. The second report came via the National Assembly thanks to another GMO political project funded by the oligarchs - Yes, Bulgaria - led by Hristo Ivanov and the Capital circle. It calls for an investigation into possible conflict of interests in connection with the proposals for amendments to the Mandatory Deposition of Publications Act introduced to parliament by Peevski, which are intended to improve transparency of media ownership and non-market financing mechanisms of the country’s publications. The Capital circle saw a serious problem in the bill as it, if enacted, would reveal to the public that the Fake News Factory’s media outlets are funded with grants and financial injections from oligarchs in trouble with the law. 
The anti-corruption Commission is clear that in the case of both reports no evidence was found of any wrongdoing committed by Delyan Peevski. On the contrary - bringing media funding to light is in the public interest and it does not benefit the members of the media group owned by the lawmaker but rather all Bulgarian citizens. Moreover, the inspection of Peevski’s income shows that the MP is among the nation’s largest taxpayers, while his property is constantly being scrutinised by the revenue agency. The National Revenue Agency disclosed the fact that its officers have checked the income and expenses of Delyan Peevski, who was subjected to regular inspections from January 2003 until December 2017, all of which concluded that there is no discrepancy. The Commission even asked Peevski to provide the original accounting documents of his income and once he did so no deviations from his financial statement were found. 
Because of the allegation that cases against Peevski were illegally discontinued, the Commission asked the Prosecutor’s Office for all its available paperwork on Delyan Peevski. The documentation showed that there were a total of five cases opened, which were either terminated or ended in conclusion that there were no grounds to launch pre-trial proceedings. All decisions ruled by the prosecutors on the cases were confirmed by their superior prosecutors and no prosecutorial oversights or violations committed by the lawmaker were found.

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