Satellite

    • Space junk cleanup to begin with ESA mission

      Space junk cleanup to begin with ESA mission

      Wherever we humans go, we leave behind a mess. That goes for space, too. Today, our species is responsible for more than 500,000 pieces of junk hurtling around Earth at phenomenal speeds, and if we don't start actively removing the largest pieces, the risk of collisions will only grow worse.

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    • The era of commercial satellite servicing arrives

      The era of commercial satellite servicing arrives

      Next year, the long-held dream of repairing satellites already in orbit around Earth will come a little closer to reality. Two new missions - from military contractor Northrop Grumman and a startup called Astroscale - will send spacecraft into orbit to rendezvous with other vehicles zooming around Earth to see if it's possible for two satellites to delicately meet up with each other in space.

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    • China launches first private rocket

      China launches first private rocket

      A Chinese startup successfully launched the country's first commercial rocket capable of carrying satellites into orbit Thursday, as the space race between China and the US heats up. The 20-metre rocket named Hyperbola-1 and designed by Beijing-based Interstellar Glory Space Technology - also known as iSpace - reached an altitude of 300 kilometres, according to a statement on the company's official WeChat social media account.

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    • SpaceX launches first GPS3 satellite

      SpaceX launches first GPS3 satellite

      A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket roared to life and streaked away from Cape Canaveral early Sunday carrying the first in a powerful new generation of GPS navigation satellites into orbit. It was the company's 21st launch this year and its first Pentagon-sanctioned national security mission, marking a significant achievement for Elon Musk's privately-held company, which has been trying to break into the military space launch market for years.

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    • NASA's new planet hunter is on

      NASA's new planet hunter is on

      NASA's newest planet-hunting satellite officially began its two-year science mission last Wednesday after 12 years of planning. Short for Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, TESS even started gathering science data already and it will transit its first observations to Earth in August, thereafter periodically every 13.5 days, mission team members said in a statement.

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