Google

    • Google reveals new Stadia details

      Google reveals new Stadia details

      You do not have to wory anymore! You will now lose access to your games on Google Stadia even if its publisher decides to exit the platform. That's one of the things the tech giant has revealed in a comprehensive update to the service's FAQ where it said that once you purchase the game on its platform, you will own the right to play it. That means one wlll still be able to access it even if time comes that it's no longer available for purchase.

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    • Google Maps to simplify commutes

      Google Maps to simplify commutes

      Public transportation is something that undoubtedly plenty of us rely on when it comes to daily commuting, but there are times when the local transit system is anything but reliable. Those who use it to travel back and forth to work are used to being stuck on a moving can of sardines, locked elbow to elbow with their fellow commuters into buses, tramps or subway cars, but sometimes there are just too many passengers and you can’t board.

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    • New US law forces big tech to disclose value of data

      New US law forces big tech to disclose value of data

      A new bill, that would force tech giants like Google, Amazon, and Facebook to tell users how much their data is worth was introduced by American lawmakers on Monday. In an age where data is exploited as one of the world’s most valuable resources, the law would put a spotlight on what’s otherwise been a hidden side to the tech economy.

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    • Ubisoft announces new subscription service

      Ubisoft announces new subscription service

      At its E3 press conference on Tuesday, Ubisoft announced its brand new subscription service called UPlay+. As promised by the company, for $14.99 a month, subscribers will be able to access every title in their catalog as a PC download (starting 3 September) and through Google's Stadia streaming service (starting in 2020).

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    • Microsoft, Alphabet to teach quantum computing

      Microsoft, Alphabet to teach quantum computing

      Quantum computing is a tough nut to crack but tech giant Microsoft has now joined hands with Google’s parent company Alphabet to change that by teaching important lessons on algorithms through a short online curriculum.
      For the online curriculum to become reality, Microsoft partnered with Alphabet’s X and Brilliant platforms.

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    • Apple, Google accused of ‘massive music piracy’

      Apple, Google accused of ‘massive music piracy’

      Apple, Amazon, Google, Microsoft and Pandora are all being sued by the estate of Harold Arlen, the composer of Over the Rainbow and many other classic songs. According to the 148-page lawsuit, the tech companies are being accused of being involved in a ‘massive music piracy operation,’ which involves over 6,000 pirated recordings. 

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    • Australia cracks down on social media with new laws

      Australia cracks down on social media with new laws

      Social media executives could spend up to three years in prison and their firms be fined 10 percent of their turnover if they fail to quickly remove violent material from their platforms, according to a new law proposed by the Australian government. The new legislation will be presented to the parliament next week - in lawmakers' final days in power before the federal election.

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    • Google enters the gaming industry

      Google enters the gaming industry

      After months of rumors and recent teases from the company itself, Google finally revealed its big gaming announcement that all have been waiting for during a Game Developers Conference keynote on 19 March in San Francisco. And now we could fairly say that the tech giant is getting into gaming in a big way with a direct challenge to the giants of console and PC gaming. This challenge is called Stadia.

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    • Google urges MEPs to reconsider copyright law

      Google urges MEPs to reconsider copyright law

      With the European Parliament due to vote this month on the final approval of EU's new Copyright Directive, Google warned that the proposed Digital Single Market rules, specifically Article 13 of the directive, will result in the over-blocking of content and the punishment of smaller publishers more than bigger fish like itself, hurting Europe for "decades to come".

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