Member States


    • Fire kills eight in Paris apartment block

      Fire kills eight in Paris apartment block

      A fire which ripped through a building in a wealthy Paris neighbourhood killed at least 8 people and injured another 36. The overnight blaze at an apartment block is treated by the police as possible arson, officials said Tuesday, adding that a woman had been detained during investigations.

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    • Merkel, Abe agree to boost security and economic cooperation

      Merkel, Abe agree to boost security and economic cooperation

      German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Japanese PM Shinzo Abe agreed on Monday that the two countries would expand bilateral defence and security cooperation, news wires reported. Merkel, who arrived in Tokyo earlier in the day for a two-day visit, reached with Abe a broad agreement on the handling of classified information to facilitate the exchange of tip-offs relating to international crimes, including terrorism.

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    • New party to challenge the ruling right-wings in Poland

      New party to challenge the ruling right-wings in Poland

      A new liberal party was inaugurated last Sunday in Poland with the aim to challenge the ruling right-wing Law and Order (PiS) at the European and national elections this year. It was founded by Robert Biedron, Poland's first openly gay mayor, and named “Wiosna” (“Spring”). At the party's founding convention he expressed ambitions to steal seats mainly from the PiS.

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    • Macron eyeing referendum in May

      Macron eyeing referendum in May

      French President Emmanuel Macron is reportedly considering organising what would be the first referendum in France in 14 years as part of his response to "yellow vest" protests. According to French weekly Journal du Dimanche, the referendum is likely to be held on 26 May and would coincide with the European Parliament elections. It will furthermore, include proposals on social and economic reforms.

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    • Britain, EU on collision course

      Britain, EU on collision course

      The UK went further on a collision course with the EU after the House of Commons voted on Tuesday to support PM Theresa May in her efforts to reach a divorce deal amendment, news wires reported. The MPs demanded she renegotiate the deal, while EU Member States and officials claim negotiations could not be reopened less than two months before the UK is due by law to leave the EU.

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    • Orban's party will not join Italian-led eurosceptic alliance

      Orban's party will not join Italian-led eurosceptic alliance

      Hungarian PM Viktor Orban’s ruling Fidesz party will not join a eurosceptic alliance spearheaded by Italy in the run-up to European Parliament elections despite their common hard line on immigration, a government official said on Wednesday. Early this month, Italy’s far-right Deputy PM Matteo Salvini proposed that Italy and Poland join forces to reshape Europe, trying to drum up support for a eurosceptic alliance ahead of EP elections in May.

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    • Deal struck to share migrants rescued near Italy

      Deal struck to share migrants rescued near Italy

      Italy on Wednesday finally gave permission for 47 rescued migrants aboard the Sea Watch NGO vessel to disembark after six other EU countries have agreed to take them in. France, Germany, Malta, Portugal, Romania and Luxembourg responded to Rome's request to take the asylum seekers who have been stuck on the Sea Watch 3 vessel near Sicily for nearly two weeks, PM Giuseppe Conte said.

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    • Greece starts selling bonds, raises minimum wage

      Greece starts selling bonds, raises minimum wage

      Greece started on Tuesday selling bonds for the first time since the end of its international bailout last summer, testing investor interest, news wires reported. The country opened the books on a syndicated offering of about €2bn of five-year bonds after hiring banks a day earlier. It would make Greece the last peripheral euro-area nation to sell debt this month.

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    • Germany to shutter all of its 84 coal-fired plants

      Germany to shutter all of its 84 coal-fired plants

      In what is seen as a pioneering move, Germany would shut down all 84 of its coal-fired power plants over a 19-year span in an effort to combat climate change. The commitment was announced by a 28-member government commission, representing mining regions, utility companies, scientists and environmentalists, with chairman Ronald Pofalla noting that it marked an "historic accomplishment." 

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