Europe has already started to woo new partners, tackle fresh challenges and explore roads less-travelled
Shada Islam
Enough tears have been shed, egos and emotions shaken and obituaries written about the transatlantic relationship. It’s time to move on. So wipe the tears, stop the whining and turn over a new page. The US has embarked on a new journey. The EU should do the same. Europe has already started to woo new partners, tackle fresh challenges and explore roads less-travelled. But more can be done.
Critics of the new government hoped that its actions would soon make supporters think twice
Manes Weisskircher
Six months ago, on 18 December, the new Austrian government was sworn in. Its composition guaranteed international media attention: First, the 31-year-old Sebastian Kurz, leader of the conservative People’s Party (OVP), became chancellor. Second, the radical right Freedom Party of Austria (FPO) returned to power. Its long-term leader Heinz-Christian Strache became Austria’s vice-chancellor. Last year, not only the FPO, but also the OVP put restrictive positions on immigration and integration at the centre of its electoral campaign. The parties of the left proved unable to respond effectively – the Social Democrats (SPO) lost the chancellorship, while the Greens were voted out of parliament completely. The OVP and FPO agreed on a coalition agreement that focuses on liberal economic policies and measures to reduce immigration.
 
 
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